Do you have a cerebrospinal fluid leak after a car crash?

On Behalf of | Jun 8, 2021 | Firm News

While all your organs are important, your brain is a major part of the person you are. After all, not only does your brain control all bodily functions, but it also determines your personality, intelligence, interests and skills. Regrettably, a motor vehicle accident may cause you to sustain a catastrophic traumatic brain injury.

Even though all brain injuries have the potential to affect your life negatively, a cerebrospinal fluid leak may put your life in jeopardy. Consequently, if you have one, you must seek immediate medical care to maximize your odds both of surviving and returning to your pre-crash health.

What is cerebrospinal fluid?

Cerebrospinal fluid is simply the clear fluid that surrounds your brain and spinal cord. This fluid helps to provide additional support for these vital parts of your central nervous system. It also delivers nutrients and oxygen to your brain and spinal cord while removing toxins and waste.

Why does cerebrospinal fluid leak?

Cerebrospinal fluid stays in place because of a three-layer membrane called the meninges. If you hit your head during a car accident, your meninges may rupture. Ruptured meninges may allow cerebrospinal fluid to flow into your ear and nasal cavities, ultimately leaking out through your nose or ears.

How do doctors treat cerebrospinal fluid leaks?

Cerebrospinal fluid leaks are medical emergencies, as they may deprive the brain and spinal cord of both support and nutrients. Ruptured meninges may also cause you to develop meningitis or another serious brain infection. Fortunately, doctors may treat a cerebrospinal fluid leak with bed rest, hydration, caffeine infusions or even surgery.

While cerebrospinal fluid leaks may be expensive to treat, you cannot ignore brain health after a car accident. Ultimately, to help you pay for the treatment you need, you may be able to pursue financial compensation from the driver who caused the crash that caused your cerebrospinal fluid leak.

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