Brain injuries are some of the most expensive injuries that people can possibly suffer. The medical care required for their treatment alone will cost tens of thousands of dollars in most cases. There are other costs to consider as well, including lost wages from the person with the injury, lost wages from a family member serving as a caregiver, costs associated with accessibility remodeling in the home and more.

While it is common for people to struggle with money right after a car accident or a slip-and-fall leaves a member of their family with a traumatic brain injury (TBI), that doesn’t mean that you should take the earliest offer that you receive from the insurance company. Your costs might be higher than you expect.

Medical expenses alone will cost tens of thousands of dollars

The more severe a brain injury is, the more it’s going to cost to treat. The most severe injuries may require extreme medical interventions like life support that cost thousands of dollars a day. However, people often feel surprised when they learn that less severe brain injuries can also cost a salary or several years of someone’s salary just in medical costs.

The average cost to treat a mild TBI ranges from $33,284 to $35,954, while those with moderate brain injuries will likely incur between $25,174 to $81,153 in medical costs. After totaling up the costs of medical care, there will still be lost wages, lost benefits, and lost work and services for the family to consider as well.

You need a big-picture perspective when pursuing compensation

After a TBI leaves you or a loved one unable to work and in need of expensive medical care, it’s easy to fall into the trap of focusing solely on your short-term needs because the family is in crisis.

However, especially when it comes to dealing with insurance companies and getting compensation, it is of the utmost importance that you look at the long-term implications for the injury and how it’s going to impact your entire family.

Getting the right medical help and support during this difficult time, including help with negotiating claims and pursuing compensation, can help you focus on your loved one’s recovery instead of on your need for financial compensation.