The University of Arizona pays male employees thousands of dollars more per year than female employees, according to a recent class action lawsuit. An associate professor at the university recently filed a $20 million lawsuit against the Arizona Board of Regents. However, Arizona is not the only school facing pay discrimination issues based on gender.

According to the recent lawsuit, female professors are not receiving raises and promotions at the same rate as men in the same positions. For example, a male professor that was hired at the same time as one of the plaintiffs currently receives over $30 thousand more per year, even though they were tenured on the same year. Even male professors with lower performance scores and fewer published works are receiving $10 thousand to $35 thousand more per year.

Colorado has experienced two similar cases. Earlier this year, the University of Denver settled a nearly $3 million case brought by eight female law professors. Female professors at the law school were earning nearly $20 thousand less on average than male professors. To escape embarrassment, the school settled the claims outside of court.

Colorado State University, on the other hand, has attempted to close the pay gap it found in 2015. The university discovered it had been targeting salary goals differently between male and female professors, often setting higher goals for men. The university found the average female professor made more than 15 percent less than a male counterpart. Tragically, this discrepancy is currently occurring across hundreds of colleges and universities in the United States.

In California, there are state and federal laws that prohibit employers from paying women less than men based on gender. If you feel that you are a victim of pay discrimination, consider speaking with an employment law attorney to help you fight for the compensation you deserve.